MISJA 21: Podróż dookoła Polski w 21 dni Euro

Nasi wysłannicy z Londynu i Łodzi - Petter Larsson z City University i Maciej Stańczyk z Gazety Wyborczej - przemierzają kraj w poszukiwaniu największego sukcesu i porażki Mistrzostw Europy w Piłce Nożnej UEFA - Euro 2012.

Wpisy

  • środa, 20 czerwca 2012
    • A cozy city centre with chanting or Cohen covers

      On the way to Poznan's market square on Monday night:

      On the way to Poznan's market square on Tuesday night:

      In Asia's crowded big cities I have missed the open green areas and in Poznan, all open areas have been green - thanks to the Irish supporters. Last night it was interesting to see how the green shirts on the square were much less and the vibe was completely different. Poznan's market square is still a great place for people to meet in the evenings even though the Irishmen chanting "Come on you boys in green" yesterday were replaced by an Italian busker who, surrounded by around hundred admirers, sang smooth tunes such as Leonard Cohen's "Halleluja" and Tracy Chapman's "Fast Car".

      Looking at the pulse in Poznan without the Irishmen I will still definitely recommend the city over Krakow or Warsaw to anyone going to Poland. The less touristic, more local and chatty vibe I've experienced in Poznan's centre has definitely suited me perfectly and as we're now leaving it behind I hope to be back here - with or without Irishmen.

      Szczegóły wpisu

      Komentarze:
      (0)
      Tagi:
      Kategoria:
      Autor(ka):
      petter.larsson
      Czas publikacji:
      środa, 20 czerwca 2012 15:21
    • Dear God, what a night!

      After a few weeks of drinking and other sins, many would think it’s a good idea to go to church. So did this Irish supporter, who after the last big Irish party had passed out on one of the benches in Poznan’s Parish Church. Surely he came out on the streets ready to go back home as a sober and better human being.

      Szczegóły wpisu

      Komentarze:
      (1) Pokaż komentarze do wpisu „Dear God, what a night!”
      Tagi:
      Kategoria:
      Autor(ka):
      petter.larsson
      Czas publikacji:
      środa, 20 czerwca 2012 12:31
    • Social segregation in the zone

      In Poznan’s already small Fan Zone they’ve made a lot of space to build a temporary glass apartment house. For 300zl one can get a room with sofas, TV, snacks and a great view through the glass walls to overlook the people sweating down in the crowd in front of the big screen.

      It is something I have never seen in any other fan zone and it feels awkward watching people walking around in their temporary living rooms as if it was some kind of aquarium in which one can watch rich people eat snacks and watch TV.

      Andrzej, 35, said he’d tried to get a room for the Poland games but that it had been sold out. He said: “I think it would have been very comfortable.”

      He admitted that the atmosphere was better downstairs but said: “You can go out on the balcony and feel it from there.”

      Darryl, from Galway in Ireland, said he thought it looked weird. He said: “There’s no atmosphere in there at all. It looks very quiet. It’s not a football thing.”

      Marek, 23, a Poznan student, said: “I don’t think it’s worth 300zl and I don’t get the point. The view maybe, but the view is good here too. It’s just like sitting at home but then there’s the crowd below, that’s it.”

      His Hungarian friend added: “I think it’s just ridiculous. It’s just a show off. Standing on the rooftop there makes some sense because of the view but the people on the other floors just look stupid.”

      Poznan’s cozy Fan Zone has apparently been overfull very early during the big games and without the glasshouse in which you can buy yourself free from the crowds, more people would definitely have been able to enjoy the Fan Zone. I have never enjoyed VIP areas in clubs as I don’t see the point in just being able to mix with five per cent of the people in a club, and going to a crowd just to separate oneself from everyone in it seems even less understandable.

      Szczegóły wpisu

      Komentarze:
      (0)
      Tagi:
      Kategoria:
      Autor(ka):
      petter.larsson
      Czas publikacji:
      środa, 20 czerwca 2012 09:58
  • wtorek, 19 czerwca 2012
    • Polish legends: The roadbuilding philosopher

      Adam Konrad, our host in Gdansk, is as colourful as his flat that has walls in red, green, orange and yellow. He picks us up at the train station and drives us seven kilometres outside the city centre to a little village named Borkowo. As we drive up the road, the 31-year-old, who has a degree in philosophy from University of Gdansk, points and says: ”I have built those roads.”

      Adam is not only a philosopher who reads more books than the English fans drink beers, he is also a road construction engineer – a profession I after our bus ride here think seems great in this country.

      We met Adam through the website couchsurfing. Adam, who introduces himself as “a person who has ’his own world’" on his profile page, has been a member there for two years. He says: ”Couchsurfing is great because everyone could meet everyone, wherever people live and whoever they are. And it's a no-money project, so you can feel friendly, this isn't a business!”

      He moved from Rumia, a city with 45,000 inhabitants 34 kilometres East of Gdansk, nine months ago and he doesn’t regret it. He wants to keep seeing new things. He says: “Gdansk has a lot of things to do and all around the year many tourists arrive to Gdansk, so it is always alive. For me this city is fascinating because of its age - it is more than 1000 old.”

      Adam says he likes the gothic cathedrals and medieval architecture in general as he tells me about the past times when Gdansk was a great polish city called "the granary of Europe".

      Adam, who so far has watched the Euro games in his friend’s house and in Gdynia’s Fan Zone, says he thinks the climate in Gdansk during the tournament is great – especially because of the Spanish fans. He says: ”There hasn’t been and will probably not be any bigger problems with the organisation or between different fans.”

      We enter a house that is far from medieval and so new that they haven’t yet taken the wooden protection from the lifts. We also find that also Adam’s flat still is developing.

      Since moving in he has, with help from his father, already painted all walls in different colours, put a nice fluffy carpet in the living room and decorated the walls with words of wisdom.

      He says: “I want to have a colourful life, so my walls are colourful too. In the large room one wall is red, another yellow and another is green, like on the reggae flag, and one time I want to go to this island [Jamaica] too.”

      It turns out the sentences on his wall are not something he has thought a lot about, but scribble of random thoughts he has come up with. About using his wall as a notepad he says: “Sometimes I must write it exactly in the moment when it comes to me, to remember for the future.”

      His walls may be a piece of art but he has not yet got a real kitchen apart from a little stove and the only furniture he has in his living room is a chair and a desk. That is however all you need. He has written two books and read more than students in an average university read together in a century.

      He likes to read them many at the time, just like it is nice to eat many different dishes together. He says he always reads more or less six books at the time because he reads so much that one or two at the same time would be boring.

      Adam is a funny guy but when he talks about the books he has written he gets as deep as Sweden’s standard in this tournament. He says: “My books are an expression of myself - my consciousness and unconsciousness, my fight with social forms within polish society - fight of the man who wants to be free, but don't want to destroy his relationships with the world around him.”

      He says his last book called “Mythology” is a story of an unknown city where many strange things happens and gives me examples from “Jesus returning to earth as a poor carpenter”, to “dirty elections in which politician Bulvio Milanese and porn star Jon Jeremy participates”, and, as he puts it, “many other threads immersed in philosophical-mythological-futurological structure.”

      The main thing I get from what Adam says is that his books probably make Stieg Larsson’s clever stories look like children’s books.

      He is not a big football fan but he plays in the amateur league every Sunday. His team’s name is Russian - Metalurg Wolgograd. Adam says he thinks the team exists somewhere in Russia as he shows me his green match shirt with Russian letters on and number 0 on the back.

      His other interests are psychedelic music, books, travels and party so anyone being hosted by Adam will for sure find some common interests with him.

      Apart from visiting his friends in Berlin next month, Adam’s biggest goals right now concern his writing. He says: “I want to publish my last book and want to write another better text.”

      Many people coming to Poland might have a stereotype of this country as a grey place where people work hard, drink vodka and aren’t interested in anything beyond that. And the Polish people, like Adam, will during the forthcoming weeks, show the world how wrong that idea is.

      

      Szczegóły wpisu

      Komentarze:
      (0)
      Tagi:
      Kategoria:
      Autor(ka):
      petter.larsson
      Czas publikacji:
      wtorek, 19 czerwca 2012 23:37
    • Bye bye Ireland!

      This is what the Irishmen looked like yesterday:

      This is what the Irishmen looked like today:


      This is what they will look like tomorrow.

      Everything has to come to an end and the Irish fans, who had sung about their legend Gary Breen all night, were today walking around in Poznan with their suitcases. Some left straight to the airport after the game. I know that because we got on an airport bus by mistake yesterday.

      Still excited about their past few weeks, many said they’d be back here for sure. All Irishmen in the city and on the fan camp that we spoke to today also agreed on two other things; their team had played a terrible football and Polish women are stunning.

      Brian, Brendon and Neil had a last lunch at the market square after two weeks in Poland. Brian said: “It feels sad to say goodbye to all the beautiful women, but we won’t miss the football. The football was terrible. We were very bad but the women make it okey.”

      Neil said: “We have fun memories – fun memories of the women of Poznan.”

      The trio was going to stop by in Oslo on their way to spend their last money and then start working on Thursday.

      Niall, another Irishman, was also on his way back. He said: “I will miss this place. People here have been so nice and friendly. It’s just a big shame our team didn’t do well.” Niall said he definitely wanted to come back to Poznan. He said: “It would be nice to see what Poznan looks like without the tournament. I have some friends staying here for another day and I wish I could do that too to really see this city because it’s really beautiful.”

      He looked fresh but said it had been a great party last night. He said: “The football was terrible but what can you do about it. We will always party.”

      Paraic, 31(left), leaving to Dublin via Lodz today, said: “It was all around a very good experience. People in Gdansk, Poznan, Sopot were all very friendly. Maybe too much alcohol though…”

      He said they’d had some disappointing results but that other things had made up for it. He said: “We had a good anyway. The weather was nice, women are beautiful.”

      His favourite place in Poland was Sopot. He said: “I might travel back there with my girlfriend for a weekend.”

      Paraic, who will be back at work on Friday, in time for the weekend, said: “Polish food was really nice and there’s a good variety. Very enjoyable. Maybe it’s quite expensive at the square but if you move away from there the prices are quite reasonable.”

      Paraic’s best memory from the tournament was the day Ireland played Spain. He said: “Before the game, on the train on the way there, during the game and after it was great although the team test our patience. Unfortunately, they did what they could do. They’re mediocre players and I suppose it was an achievement just to qualify.”

      Kieran, who has lived in his campervan at the fan camp by the Malta lake, said he’d stay for another day before leaving the now quite empty camping site. Kieran’s friend had gone back to work and he was now going to travel in Europe with his van for two more months.

      Kieran said his favourite place in Poland was Sopot as Poznan would get too crowded when it rained and he loved the atmosphere around the big square in Sopot. He said: “If I was to come back, I would come back to Sopot. The Irish team stayed there so they must know it was the best place.”

      He said his love to Sopot also could have to do with one of his best memories from the tournament. He said: “The Irish team came out to their balcony, waved and started to throw football boots. Then I got a jersey. I caught one.”

      He showed the Irish football shirt he was wearing and said: “For me, I it was the best place for that reason,” but added: “Everywhere here is nice. Polish people are very welcoming and you know - we party everywhere we are.”

      He said there would probably be a lot of Polish people going to Ireland now after the good reputation the Irish supporters had given their country in Poland. He said: “Wearing this [Ireland’s] shirt is like having shirt saying: ‘Please give me information and fun.’ When I wear this there are always locals coming up to me wanting to talk and take a picture but when I don’t nobody do that.”

      Kieran’s campervan neighbour came out and added: “I’ll be sad to go home. We’re all going home with Polish wives though.”

      Bin there, done that.

      Szczegóły wpisu

      Komentarze:
      (0)
      Tagi:
      Kategoria:
      Autor(ka):
      petter.larsson
      Czas publikacji:
      wtorek, 19 czerwca 2012 20:36
    • Syndrom Lilahammer

      Przewiduję, że poznaniacy będą wkrótce potrzebować pomocy psychologicznej.

      Gospodarzem zimowych Igrzysk Olimpijskich w 1994 roku było norweskie miasteczko Lillehammer. Liczy sobie około 25 tys. mieszkańców. Jak łatwo się domyślić, było to najważniejsze wydarzenie w historii tej miejscowości.  W zawodach startowało ponad 1700 zawodników z 67 krajów. Przez dwa tygodnie przez Lillehammer przewinęły się dziesiątki, jeśli nie setki tysięcy turystów, dziennikarzy i kibiców. A później wszyscy wyjechali.

      SMUTNO MI BĘDZIE BEZ IRLANDCZYKÓW

      - Po Igrzyskach wielu mieszkańców Lillehammer zaczęło chorować na depresję. Przez kilka lat intensywnie przygotowywali się do imprezy. Gdy się skończyła, czuli pustkę i brak chęci do życia. W końcu, prawdopodobnie nic ciekawszego już ich w życiu nie spotka - opowiadał mi Petter pewnego wieczoru. - Od tego czasu w Skandynawii mówi się o „syndromie Lilahammer”.

      Dziś wielu poznaniaków odczuło na własnej skórze to, co mieszkańcy norweskiego miasteczka. Irlandczycy wyjechali i ich brak można odczuć bardzo wyraźnie. Z ulic znikły zielone koszulki, nikt nie śpiewa na Rynku, w knajpach i ogródkach znowu nietrudno o wolne miejsce.

      - Smutno, że pojechali. To były bardzo dobre dwa tygodnie. Pięknie się bawili. No i dali zarobić - mówiła pani Wioletta, która handluje pamiątkami na poznańskim Rynku. - Przed Euro w Poznaniu było okropnie. Remontowali drogi i tory tramwajowe. W kółko objazdy i korki. Ale moim zdaniem było warto!

      W podobnym wypowiadał się Jarek, który od dwóch lat wozi dorożką turystów. - Widziałem, że kibice byli zachwyceni Poznaniem. Mieszkańcy też są dumni z bycia gospodarzem Euro. Co my teraz zrobimy? Trzeba będzie wrócić do normalnego rytmu pracy. To był szalony czas.

      POZNANIACY SĄ DUMNI - MÓWIŁ JAREK

      O bardzo intensywnej pracy opowiadała też Klaudia, barmanka w jednej z małych, przytulnych kawiarni przy Rynku.

      - Z jednej strony czujemy ulgę, bo wreszcie będzie można odpocząć. Z drugiej smutek. Szkoda, że ostatni mecz w Poznaniu już za nami - mówiła.

      Przed lokalem nadal stoi koziołek reklamowy z hasłem „Irish breakfast”. Kiedy zniknie?

      - Zostaje. Irlandzkie śniadanie spodobało się. A kilku Irlandczyków mówiło, że wracają tylko po żony i przeprowadzają się do Poznania - śmiała się Klaudia.

       KLAUDIA Z LEWEJ.

      

      Szczegóły wpisu

      Komentarze:
      (3) Pokaż komentarze do wpisu „Syndrom Lilahammer”
      Tagi:
      Kategoria:
      Autor(ka):
      maciek.stanczyk
      Czas publikacji:
      wtorek, 19 czerwca 2012 20:20
    • Do you support Italy? No, I support Milan!

      Sure, the Irish are many and loud, we have leant that in Poznan. The question is why the Italians, who actually are a team with some hope for the future, are so few and so quiet. Italy, the passionate football country, was just hiding in one of the stadium’s corners during the game and it was impossible to hear them. When it was their turn to celebrate their quarterfinal place on the market square, they had to stand there in a big green ocean, singing Irish songs instead.

      As green-white-orange – not green-white-red – flags were waving in the early hours as many hundred Poles and Irishmen chanted their songs outside the city hall just like about 12 hours earlier, I spoke to one of last night’s big winners. On the pitch that is.

      Luca, from Rome, stood by himself, watching the Irishmen celebrate their last day in Poland. He said: “A lot of Italians don’t come to the Euro because they are prioritising their club teams.”

      He said his country was going through a tough economic phase and that people only could afford the most essential. He said: “For many people the club team is more important than the national team.”

      Luca, a Roma fan, said that his team’s supporters supported the Italian team more when their big stars such as Marco Delvecchio, Vincenzo Montella and Francesco Totti were representing Gli Azzurri.

      We discussed if this can say something about the Italian mentality today – people look after what’s close to them but don’t really care about the bigger picture – and Luca, said that it made sense. 

      Luca, who is going home today, said that since the Italians perhaps only could afford going to one game it was possible that many would come to the quarterfinal.

      Or are they so confident in their team that they wait for a semi-final?

      Ireland also been hit hard by the economic crisis but Irishmen I have spoken to say they see the Euro as an invaluable light in the dark. But then Ireland has no Milan, Roma or Juventus.

      Szczegóły wpisu

      Komentarze:
      (0)
      Tagi:
      Kategoria:
      Autor(ka):
      petter.larsson
      Czas publikacji:
      wtorek, 19 czerwca 2012 12:45

Kalendarz

Listopad 2017

Pn Wt Śr Cz Pt So Nd
    1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30      

Kanał informacyjny

    Szukaj nas na:

    Wybierz język

Nasi misjonarze